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The Twilight Sad - It Won/t Be Like This All The Time album FLAC

  • Performer: The Twilight Sad
  • Title: It Won/t Be Like This All The Time
  • Genre: Rock
  • Formats: VOC AHX TTA ASF VOC DTS AU
  • Released: 2019
  • Style: Alternative Rock, Indie Rock, Post-Punk
  • MP3 album: 1962 mb
  • FLAC album: 1947 mb
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 640
The Twilight Sad - It Won/t Be Like This All The Time album FLAC

It Won/t Be Like This All the Time (stylized in all caps) is the fifth studio album by Scottish indie rock band The Twilight Sad, released by Rock Action Records on 18 January 2019. The album is the band's first studio album on Rock Action (the band had previously been signed to Fat Cat Records since 2005), and their first since the amicable departure of founding member Mark Devine in early 2018

Few bands of the Twilight Sad’s generation have even made it to album five, let alone grown with each release, but ‘It Won/t Be Like This All The Time’ is the sound of a band in rude health. Even though this record does have some enjoyable and compelling moments lyrically, this definitely doesn't live up to all the hype from critics because there isn't anything special about this that we haven't heard hundreds of times before from other post-punk artists. I still think it's worth a listen, but don't expect this to be a masterpiece. 5. 5mo. Emperor of Sound 天皇. 83. It took me exactly 3 listens to realize, that The Twilight Sad had just released an absolute banger of a record.

This is their most listenable album, one that dials back the heavy-handed metaphors and overwhelming musical gloom for something more danceable and upbeat, though still dour as ever lyrically. Rather than being owned by their demons, The Twilight Sad have created an 11-track exorcism to master them. We should feel grateful to have them.

This was an album that could so easily have not existed at all. The Twilight Sad’s 2007 debut ‘Fourteen Autumns & Fifteen Winters’ was critically adored and soon became an indie cult favourite. Their dense – and intense – approach to wrought Scottish gloom and post-punk bloomed across three lauded records, until 2014’s ‘Nobody Wants To Be Here And Nobody Wants To Leave’ left them, exhausted, ready to call it quits. Enter Robert Smith, who invited them to support The Cure on all world tour dates for a few years. The synth sounds of ‘Sunday Day13’ provides some pensive breathing space, as a grief-stricken Graham sees a break in the clouds: It won’t be like this all the time.

As a result, this is their most listenable album, one that dials back the heavy-handed metaphors and overwhelming musical gloom for something more danceable and upbeat, though still dour as ever lyrically. I think it’s the next stage of who we’re meant to be. We weren’t nit-picking; it just came naturally. It feels more like a band. Robert Smith of The Cure famously said that are the best band playing the best songs – consistently brilliant, emotional, intense, inspiring, entertaining.

The Twilight Sad. Album It Won/T Be Like This All the Time. I won't keep All the hurt you gave to me I'm scared of everyone I meet I can tell your talk is cheap You can't delete All the names you've called me I'm not even scared of these I'm keeping secrets you can't see. On the hook A touch without a second look I'm keeping this far from you Stories that won't come true.

This is the Twilight Sad's first album for Rock Action, the label run by Mogwai, another Scottish band who knows a thing or two about making intensely emotional and loud music, and "Auge/Maschine"'s massive riffs reflect the groups' common ground. During the years after Nobody Wants to Be Here and Nobody Wants to Leave's release, Graham developed a more confessional songwriting style with his other band Out Lines that surfaces on this album as well

As good as The Twilight Sad’s last record was, it occasionally felt like a concession. A singular path of progression by subtraction had resulted in the cavernous frostbite agony of 2012’s No One Can Ever Know, and the world flinched. Despite being at their artistic peak, there was no comfort in its contents, no warmth in its expression. Purposefully aligned with tombstones like The Holy Bible and Closer, if the lurking horror within was a true representation of its creators’ state of mind, we all should’ve said something. Graham prefaced this album in interviews by expressing a desire to be less cryptic. His lyrics were always frantic sketches of moments, hinting at a nameless terror happening somewhere off the page but never approaching explanation. Facets of that remain here, but it’s clear where his focus lies: loss, fear of abandonment, the crutch of alcohol and, crucially, love.

It speaks volumes, then, that more than a decade into their lives together the Scottish band can produce an album so challenging, so engrossing, and so affecting as ‘It Won/t Be Like This All The Time’. Famously aided by The Cure’s Robert Smith, a lengthy spell on the road with the group - combined with a small re-shuffle in line-up - seems to have unlocked something, allowing them to reach a new level. ’ is strikingly visceral, while ‘Shooting Dennis Hopper Shooting’ opens in languid, fractured, sub-zero climates. In discarding expectations The Twilight Sad have delivered something very special indeed. Dig it? Dig deeper: Mogwai, The Cure, Nine Inch Nails - - Join us on Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings.



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